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During the breeding season no rare or scarce breeding birds will be mentioned on the blog as well as images if in any way I believe it to put the species in jeopardy of breeding or assist anyone to the finding of a nest sight.
No wildlife including Roe Deer, Fox, Hare or Badger will be mentioned throughout the year due to the rising influx of poaching, long dogging and lamping by sick individuals.
Fly over birds and movers will be reported as usual.
BS



Monday, July 17, 2017

Why is nature so cruel. Fly Flatts

 End of its journey and a short life for this
                   juv Wheatear.
                Kestrel day at Fly Flatts









                                             A luckier juv Wheatear

1500 hrs at Fly Flatts in this horrid hot stuff but a nice cooling breeze from the west made things more workable.
                        A bad start to the watch when I came across a dead juv Wheatear by the outlet. The bird had no predator markings on it and looked as if it had flown into the wire fence possibly getting away from a predator as a second juv Wheatear was further along the banking partially plucked and eaten.
The probable culprits were at the north end of the banking with 2 Kestrels hanging around on the fence posts and down in the grass on the banking side. All Wheatears had cleared from that area with just 3 juvs back up at the south end.
                                                          The Kestrels seemed reluctant to leave the area even as I walked on at fairly close range. They tended to just fly a few yards and stop ,then return to the same spot when I was past which is unlike Kestrels which are usually up and away. I wondered if they had some prey near and did,nt want to leave it.
Two Oystercatchers were across on the east shore whilst the remaining 3 Common Sandpipers were in the se corner. A Dunlin called from under the edge of the south banking as I approached but flew before I could get the camera on it.
                                                       Meadow Pipits numbers are on the increase now ( Mick ) possibly due to post breeding with plenty juvs around but soon they,ll be starting grouping getting ready for the big move. Quiet blue skies today with just 1 LBB gull >N.
BS

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