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Friday, July 21, 2017

A Friday visit to Fly Flatts.

                               juv Wheatear
                      Male Wheatear in moult

                   These fellows did,nt mind the wind
  A party of 4 Common Sandpiper dropped in
                                  Way across on the east shore

1515hrs at Fly Flatts and again blessed with good conditions with bright grey skies,100 % cloud cover and a strong SE>5-6 easing  SE >5.
Windsurfers were on the water battling the strong wind and heavy waves which did,nt seem to bother them. Its amazing to see them steam across the water at about 60 mph heading for the banking and be able to stop only 10 ft from the shore and with no brakes at that. You cant even slide your feet, they must be as fit as a butchers dog to hold on at that speed.
                                                                 Meanwhile, back at the birding, the single Common Sandpiper and an Oystercatcher were in the SE corner whilst Swifts piled overhead. Down to the feeding station to get some weekend seed down where only 2 Wheatears were present along with a female Kestrel patrolling the banking. A Red Grouse flushed nearby which is the first I,ve seen or heard since the spring, hopefully there won,t be a good enough count again this year and the Grouse shoot will get cancelled although the organizers tend to bring Red Legged Partridge in for the little sad men to shoot .
                             Back up on the west banking 4 Herring gulls went over high and >E whilst LBB gulls headed >NW. A wader call made me look and eventually saw 4 Common Sandpipers that had come up the Calder Valley , flying across to the far east bank, yet another sign of wader movement .
The Redshanks from yesterday had moved on.
Check those reservoir edges from now, have a good weekend.
BS

2 comments:

David Sutcliffe said...

Amazing Wheatears - they are one of the first migrants to arrive in spring then often the first returners along with juveniles in July and then late leavers into October (and in one year to 23rd November).
Shame they don't seem to stay and breed locally nowadays.

Brian sumner said...

We seem to be getting more breeding attempts each year but something must be just not right for them.