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BREEDING SEASON EXCLUSIONS.

As of now through the duration of the breeding season all schedule one birds , red status birds and birds of a sensitive nature to this area will be omitted from the blog or reported as undisclosed site due to the widespread persecution of nesting birds by unscrupulous parties including game keepers and egg collectors.
Any of the above species that are obviously on passage through the area will be reported as normal.
This also applies to wildlife such as Roe Deer, Badger and Hares which are badly under threat from poaching and long dogging in the area at present and unfortunately this exclusion of wildlife will have to continue throughout the year.
Just another sign of the times.

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Birding History, Shibden Valley

Just received this e mail from customer, blog watcher John Kaye.

Alas Brian not a current one but one from 750 years ago.
Reading a Christmas present on local history I thought you might be interested in the following from 1275.

One John De Stancliffe , owner of Scout Hall, Shibden Valley, was found liable for the neglect of monitoring a nest in woods he owned - taking/ touching a Merlins nest which was lost or stolen.
Fined 6d payable to the Earl of Leeds.  Probably a fair sum of money in those days. John.

Interesting stuff John, just shows that even in those days when everything was shootable there were certain birds protected.
                                  Thanks a lot.  Brian.

5 comments:

David Sutcliffe said...

Amazing - thanks for the info !

Brian sumner said...

An interesting point from mick cunningham saying Merlin nests were probably protected so the chicks could be taken by nobles and used in falconry. Makes sense.

Steve Blacksmith said...

Very interesting Brian. Yes,from my reading Merlins were highly prized for catching small birds which people ate readily (still do in S.Europe as we know).
Ladies sometimes carried Merlins, perhaps because they were lighter.

My mother was born in a cottage on the south facing slope of Ploughcroft, on the way down to Boothtown. She had a story that if their springwater ran dry in summer, they could walk over the ridge and down to near Scout Hall where there was a spring which never ran dry. She was young in the 1930s; seems almost as far away as medieval falconry!

Brian Sumner . said...

Interesting stuff Steve. In my young days Scout Hall was known as the house with a thousand windows.

phill hirst said...

Seen a pair of quite large hawks/raptosrs no sure what type maybe of interest. In the wood back of shibden mill inn