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Saturday, April 23, 2016

One for the I.D . books ?

 Fly Flatts late afternoon , flew from the roadside
       Dunlin, Green Sandpiper size
           

                                   No white rump in flight
           Pure brown mantle, pure white underside
                                         Down curved bill
                                          Did,nt call


BS

8 comments:

heavy birder said...

Looks like a Common Sandpiper.

Daniel Branch said...

The wing bar looks for Common Sand Brian

Brian Sumner . said...

Its back and wing tops were plain chestnut brown with no mottling and the down curved bill stood out.
It was flushed by 2 joggers from the ditch at the side of the road and flew up without the usual calling and it flew with slow wing beats unlike Common Sands fluttering.

heavy birder said...

The underwing pattern is classic Common Sandpipier check out Shorebirds helm guide plate 60 page 157.

Bradshaw Rambler said...

I'll pass on the Wader I.D. if you don't mind - Bri.!!
John

AndyC said...

When you get close to a Common Sand nest / potential nest site they often do not call when they are flushed and do a different flight . Bill looks a bit down curved but deffo Common Sand for me...great photos...

Brian Sumner . said...

Thanks to all for comments, not happy but can,t turn it into anything else.
Just looked too big, Green Sand size with bulky head and longer curved bill.
Also wing beats were full sweep and slow.
Comparing Common Sand flight this morning they looked much smaller with head and bill hardly noticeable and wing beats were fast and never went above the horizontal.
Possibly all due to it being away from the environment where they are usually seen rather than flying above head height .
At least it kept us all on our toes.

David Sutcliffe said...

Apologies for the late post Bri - I can't think other than Common Sand